Indecency and the Communications Decency Act (Mosley Part 2)

[German version]

Rick Doble

Rick Doble

Even if a victim can identify his or her Internet attackers, a damaging photo or text that “goes viral” is almost unstoppable, and the damage is difficult to control. The Mosley decision in Hamburg demonstrates how Germany and the United States approach this increasingly ubiquitous problem differently.

Mr. Moseley tried to stop illegal publications by addressing the centralized nerve center without which nothing can go viral in the first place, in this case Google and its search engine. He succeeded in winning a judgment (now pending appeal) with regard to six specific pictures.

One may question whether this constituted success.

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Taking Down Google in the Hamburg Regional Court (the Mosley Case, Part 1)

[German version]

Photo: www.geekphilosopher.com

Photo: www.geekphilosopher.com

In January 2014, the Regional Court of Hamburg decided Max Mosley v. Google, Inc. This was the latest development in a story of sensational cyber defamation and harassment that is almost too salacious to ignore. It also highlights differences between German and American conceptions of privacy and liability in the Internet era.

The Hamburg court found Google liable for distributing six specific unauthorized images of Max Rufus Moseley that third parties had originally posted to the Internet.

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